Category Archives: computing

CAA 2018 CFP: Making the Most of Film and Video in Archaeology

I’m delighted to announce the call for papers for the Making the Most of Film and Video in Archaeology session, to be held at the Computing Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) international conference, March 19th and 23rd 2018 at the University of Tübigen, Germany. In this session we seek to bring archaeologists and computing specialists together to explore, problematize, and suggest creative but critically informed solutions to the challenges of integrating film and video into archaeological research designs.


MAKING THE MOST OF FILM AND VIDEO IN ARCHAEOLOGY

Keywords: Film, video, actuality, recording, filmmaking, digital archiving, databases, social media, online platforms, research design.

Despite the fact that archaeologists have experimented with various forms of filmmaking for a century we are still yet to develop a pragmatic approach to how best to integrate actuality film and video recording, editing, and archiving into our research project designs. As mediums merge and digital platforms multiply, as coders begin to replace film editors, as media technologies, standards, laws, and conventions shift – now is a timely moment to take stock and consider how we can make better use of actuality film and video in archaeological contexts. Key challenges include how to address the disconnected digital archives of historical archaeological film footage increasingly available online; how to better integrate drone, underwater, and site videography into archaeological research design and dissemination strategies; and how to better foster media literacy and skills among archaeologists tasked with researching, designing, recording, editing, managing, distributing, and digitally archiving film and video material.

This session seeks to cross industry and disciplinary boundaries by inviting archaeological scholars and computing specialists to problematise and bring fresh perspectives to the above issues by suggesting future directions for how we can make the most of digital actuality film and video in archaeology.

Suggested themes and topics include but are not restricted to:

  • Film and video as archaeological data.
  • Digital archiving, database management, and accessibility for archaeological films and videos.
  • Working with video files – what archaeologists need to know.
  • Using film and video in academic publishing.
  • The pros and cons of vlogging, social media, and online video platforms for archaeology.
  • Merging the mediums: approaches to combining actuality footage with animation, VR, AR and more.
  • Coding: the future of film editing? How we can futureproof digital archaeological storytelling.

Please note: the term ‘actuality’ is borrowed from the documentary industry and used here to describe non-fiction films and videos of actual people, places, and events – as distinct from animated or fiction films and videos.


The call for papers has just opened and will run until Sunday 29nd October 2017. Applicants will need to register with the CAA conference to submit your paper to our session. Abstracts for papers should be no more 250 words excluding session title, author names, affiliations, and email addresses and 3 – 5 keywords. Please note, the official language of the conference is English and all submissions should be in English. If English is not your first language, it is strongly suggested that you have a fluent English speaker review your abstract before submission.

You can find detailed instructions for how to submit at the CAA website.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

Kate Rogers, University of Southampton, kate.rogers@soton.ac.uk

Dr James Miles, Archaeovision, james@archaeovision.eu

 

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CFP: From amateurs to auteurs: in defence of authorship in archaeological visualisations

I’m very excited to announce that I’m working with digital artist and archaeologist Grant Cox, from ArtasMedia to bring a session about the importance of the creator’s voice in archaeological visualisations to the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference this December.

Here’s the spiel:

Archaeology borrows and adapts visualisation mediums and techniques from a range of artistic and creative practices including drawing, photography, film, gaming, digital animation and virtual reality. But do we take these visualisation practices as seriously as we do our scientific ones – or do we merely skim the surface of them, depriving ourselves of a deeper and more critical understanding of how the past is interpreted and understood? A key element of any art form, but arguably often side-lined in archaeology, is the visual author’s presence and ‘voice’. Following auteur theory, this house argues that the author’s voice in visual representations of archaeology deserves equal regard to that of the author’s voice in written archaeological works. Such a shift in values would necessitate archaeologists becoming more visually and technically literate in visual art-forms and industries in order to not only appreciate but meaningfully be able to critique and translate archaeological visualisations on a deeper level. Not only would this enhance the rights to the creators of archaeological visualisations (such as recognition, ownership and copyright), but it would also demand greater responsibility, transparency and accountability for the archaeological visualisations created.

This session invites practitioners of visual archaeologies and those who research visual representations of archaeology to critique and debate the above argument, interrogating the value and role of the author’s voice in visualising archaeology. We seek to include a range of visual forms and mediums, inclusive of but not limited to drawing, photography, video, film, gaming, digital animation, AR, VR and mixed-mediums. Archaeologists, artists, heritage professional, industry practitioners and those who straddle multiple roles are warmly welcome to submit. This session partners with TAG 2016’s art/digital/film exhibition ‘Sightations’, running on site throughout the TAG conference, and session speakers are warmly encouraged to display an example of their work in the exhibit. For more information on the exhibit please see ‘Sightations’ call for contributors.

If you’d like to be part of our session please send you name(s), affiliations, title of paper, and abstract of 250 words, to jeffers113@gmail.com or ker1g14@soton.ac.uk. We’re accepting submissions until November 15th. If you have any question please don’t hesitate to get in touch, and please share this page with anyone you think might be interested!