Category Archives: TAG

CFP: From amateurs to auteurs: in defence of authorship in archaeological visualisations

I’m very excited to announce that I’m working with digital artist and archaeologist Grant Cox, from ArtasMedia to bring a session about the importance of the creator’s voice in archaeological visualisations to the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference this December.

Here’s the spiel:

Archaeology borrows and adapts visualisation mediums and techniques from a range of artistic and creative practices including drawing, photography, film, gaming, digital animation and virtual reality. But do we take these visualisation practices as seriously as we do our scientific ones – or do we merely skim the surface of them, depriving ourselves of a deeper and more critical understanding of how the past is interpreted and understood? A key element of any art form, but arguably often side-lined in archaeology, is the visual author’s presence and ‘voice’. Following auteur theory, this house argues that the author’s voice in visual representations of archaeology deserves equal regard to that of the author’s voice in written archaeological works. Such a shift in values would necessitate archaeologists becoming more visually and technically literate in visual art-forms and industries in order to not only appreciate but meaningfully be able to critique and translate archaeological visualisations on a deeper level. Not only would this enhance the rights to the creators of archaeological visualisations (such as recognition, ownership and copyright), but it would also demand greater responsibility, transparency and accountability for the archaeological visualisations created.

This session invites practitioners of visual archaeologies and those who research visual representations of archaeology to critique and debate the above argument, interrogating the value and role of the author’s voice in visualising archaeology. We seek to include a range of visual forms and mediums, inclusive of but not limited to drawing, photography, video, film, gaming, digital animation, AR, VR and mixed-mediums. Archaeologists, artists, heritage professional, industry practitioners and those who straddle multiple roles are warmly welcome to submit. This session partners with TAG 2016’s art/digital/film exhibition ‘Sightations’, running on site throughout the TAG conference, and session speakers are warmly encouraged to display an example of their work in the exhibit. For more information on the exhibit please see ‘Sightations’ call for contributors.

If you’d like to be part of our session please send you name(s), affiliations, title of paper, and abstract of 250 words, to jeffers113@gmail.com or ker1g14@soton.ac.uk. We’re accepting submissions until November 15th. If you have any question please don’t hesitate to get in touch, and please share this page with anyone you think might be interested!

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TAG 2016, Sightations, and a very different CFP!

Are you an archaeologist? Are you an artist? Are you a bit of both? TAG 2016 Needs You! I am absolutely delighted to share a very special call for contributors to this December’s UK Theoretical Archaeology Group conference. Instead of papers we want your paintings. And your pastels. Your pencils and papers and printed works. Your pottery. Your pixels especially. Perhaps even your performance art.

I’m very excited and honored to be collaborating with fellow PhD students and archaeologists Joana Valdez-Tullett, Helen Chittock, Grant Cox and Eleonora Gandolfi to bring to the UK archaeology community the inaugural Sightations gallery – an art/digital/film showcase running as part of this year’s TAG. In keeping with this year’s overall conference theme of ‘visualisation’, this gallery seeks to unpack what it means to represent archaeology visually in 2016. By juxtaposing traditional art forms (such as drawings, photography, painting, sculpture, textiles, ceramic, and more) with digital approaches to representation (digital media, CGI, film, video, gaming, virtual reality, cross- or multi-platform works), Sightations takes aim at archaeological visual conventions and strives to reveal new links between different disciplines, industries and sectors of archaeology, drawing connections between ideas with an eye towards future directions for archaeological visualizations.

You can find out more about Sightations, including how to contribute your work, by visiting the TAG 2016 conference website; and by following us on Facebook and twitter @SightationsTAG. You can also drop us an email at info@artasmedia.com.

We’re also planning to run a more traditional conference session or two tied in with the exhibition, so if you’re interested in presenting your ideas formally, as well as exhibiting your work, please stay tuned!